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FGrOW Spring 2021 Webinar Series

When: 
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 1:00pm to Friday, April 23, 2021 - 2:00pm
Cost: 
None
Description: 

This year, the Forest Growth Organization of Western Canada will be presenting its annual technical sessions online. These technical sessions qualify for the AAFMP Continuing Competence Program (CCP) as Category 1 credits. Attendees wishing to claim credits will be required to upload their hours to an AAFMP hosted reporting system.

Quick links

Playlist of archived presentations

February 12: Precommercial Thinning in Boreal Mixedwoods Increases Spruce Yields: Dynamic Aspen Density Experiment (DADE)

February 26: Surprising (and not so surprising) results from analysis of managed stand development as influenced by silviculture and other factors in Alberta: The Empirical Post-Harvest Study (EPH)

March 5: Leverage Data Like You Mean It: Alberta’s Provincial Growth and Yield Initiative (PGYI)

March 12: Does herbicide use influence long-term biodiversity in Alberta’s forests?

March 19: Strip Cut Understory Protection (SCUP) Trial - Ivan Bjelanovic and Phil Comeau

March 26: Foothills Reforestation Interactive Planning System (FRIPSY) Rollout - Dick Dempster

April 23: Regenerated Lodgepole pine project (RLP) - Dick Dempster


February 12: Precommercial Thinning in Boreal Mixedwoods Increases Spruce Yields: Dynamic Aspen Density Experiment (DADE)

Ivan Bjelanovic and Phil Comeau

Abstract

The Dynamic Aspen Density Experiment (DADE) was initiated in 2008 to examine the response of white spruce to varying aspen densities. Objectives are to: 1) examine effects of aspen density on stand development; 2) examine effects of aspen density on survival and growth of white spruce; and, 3) evaluate the impacts of optimizing white spruce survival and growth on hardwood production. Results from the first 8 years of the study and MGM projections into the future will be presented with a discussion following the presentation.

Presenter Bios

Ivan completed a master’s degree in Forest Biology and Management at the University of Alberta under the supervision of Phil Comeau, and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Forestry from the University of Belgrade in Serbia. Currently, Ivan is working with the Canadian Forest Service on the design and development of the Wildland fire risk web application. Ivan’s involvement the DADE project was in the role of Research Assistant at the University of Alberta. At the UofA he worked on several projects within the Forest Stand Dynamics research group developing tools to predict ecosite-based forest productivity in addition to the evaluation of various silvicultural trials.

Phil is Professor Emeritus at the University of Alberta. He was Professor of Silviculture and Stand Dynamics at the UofA from 2000 to 2017. Phil has conducted research relating to competition dynamics, competition management, mixedwood management, silviculture, silvicultural systems, and Growth and Yield in western Canada. Phil has been the chair of the Western Boreal Growth and Yield (WESBOGY) project team since 2003 and has worked in the continued development of the Mixedwood growth model MGM. He was the recipient of the Canadian Institute of Forestry’s Tree of Life Award for the Rocky Mountain Section in 2014 as well as the CIF Scientific Achievement Award in 2016.


February 26: Surprising (and not so surprising) results from analysis of managed stand development as influenced by silviculture and other factors in Alberta: The Empirical Post-Harvest Study (EPH)

Robert Froese

Abstract

The Empirical Post-Harvest (or EPH) Project was designed to increase understanding of post-harvest (reforested) stand development in Alberta, taking advantage of newly available operational and research data from regenerated stands. Goals included examining stand condition to look for a silviculture “signal” in addition to other factors that drive stand development, and to examine stability in stand condition with time. Results suggest stand conditions develop as gradients where silviculture and succession signals are reliably found, but some traditional classification into strata seems to dilute the signal. Another goal was to see how silviculture propagates when young stand data are coupled with the GYPSY model. Some trends in the data seem at odds with the model, especially for spruce, which in retrospect might not be surprising. More work is needed!

Presenter Bio

Robert Froese is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science at Michigan Technological University and has been consulting in Alberta for a number of years. In June 2021 he will take on a new role as Endowed Chair in Forest Growth and Yield at the University of Alberta. He is a Certified Forester with the Society of American Foresters and remains a Registered Professional Forester in British Columbia. Robert grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia near the gates of the University of British Columbia, surrounded by the forests of Pacific Spirit Park. He has always been drawn to forests, and believes in the importance of knowledge in informing decisions people make about their place in the natural world. Robert is committed to the role that universities can have in promoting wide general good, through professional excellence, creative scholarship, and a sincere dedication to learning. This commitment has been shaped by his academic and professional experiences in British Columbia, Idaho, Michigan, and more recently in Alberta, and is the foundation of Robert’s work in forest biometrics, modelling, and growth and yield in his current position at Michigan Technological University and in his consulting work in Alberta.


March 5: Leverage Data Like You Mean It: Alberta’s Provincial Growth and Yield Initiative (PGYI)

Katrina Froese and Logan Purdy

People measuring trees in a snowy forest

Abstract

Alberta’s Provincial Growth and Yield Initiative (PGYI) was initiated in 2014 as a company-driven collaboration focused on creating a centralized, standardized source of high quality tree growth data. The initiative is intended to facilitate the development, calibration and validation of growth and yield models in Alberta and Western Canada. A centralised database, accessible through a secure web portal, houses permanent sample plot (PSP) data, which is populated by users following minimum standards and best practices to verify the quality of data submissions. Upon request, data is provided to modellers for use in research and development of growth models such as GYPSY and MGM used in Alberta. This presentation will review the history and purpose of PGYI, the importance of the initiative to growth and yield modelling, and will demonstrate some tools and processes developed to assist companies in submitting, evaluating and managing their data. Great things can be accomplished when you leverage data like you mean it!

Presenter Bios

Katrina Froese is a Resource Analyst with the Alberta Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry in Edmonton. She has nearly 20 years of experience in Alberta working as a consultant and a government employee. Katrina earned a Master’s degree in Forestry from the University of British Columbia with a focus on growth and yield. Kat is unashamedly a bit of a data nerd and nothing makes her happier than designing a new field sampling program.

Logan Purdy is a Resource Analysts at Forcorp Solutions Inc. (FORCORP) in Edmonton. Over the past two years , Logan has been involved in the maintenance, design, and user support of the Provincial Growth and Yield Initiative (PGYI) database. He completed a B.Sc. in Environmental and Conservation Sciences at the University of Alberta in 2016 and earned a dual-Masters of Science degree in Conservation and Land Management from Bangor University in Wales and Master of Forestry from the University of Alberta in 2018.

Register now.


March 12: Does herbicide use influence long-term biodiversity in Alberta’s forests?

Milo Mihajlovich

Side by side comparison of two mixedwood forests, one treated 24 years ago with herbicide, the other not.

Abstract

Herbicides are an effective tool in renewing forests in Alberta following harvesting through the reallocation of site resources to favor regenerating trees for fibre production. However, questions remain on the impacts of herbicide use on forest composition, structure, and plant biodiversity over time. There is a fair amount of information available during the regeneration phase (10-15 years post-harvest), but very little during the transition phase (20-40 years post harvest). This talk presents results from a long-term forest herbicide monitoring program, established in the mid-1990’s, to quantify impacts on biodiversity and wood fibre production 25 to 40 years post harvest. Biodiversity assessments included species richness, presence/abundance of site indicator species, Shannon Weiner diversity index and evenness. Wood fibre assessments included both standing total volume by species and projections of final volumes using both GYPSY (Growth and Yield Projection System) and the Mixedwood Growth Model (MGM). This talk will focus on the impacts of herbicide use on biodiversity, forest composition, and structure.

Supplemental reading material

Wagner, Robert G., Keith M. Little, Brian Richardson, and Ken McNabb. 2006. The role of vegetation management in enhancing the productivity of the world’s forests. Forestry Vol. 79, No. 1, pp. 57-79.

Lautenschlager, R.A. and Thomas P. Sullivan. 2002. Effects of herbicide treatments on biotic components in regenerating northern forests. The Forestry Chronicle. 78-5: 695-731.

Presenter bio

Milo Mihajlovich is a native Albertan who graduated from the University of Alberta in 1976 with a bachelor’s in forestry sciences. Following a long career in reforestation, reclamation and woody plant management on pasture lands, Milo retired from the active practice of forestry as an active Alberta Registered Professional Forester in 2020. He has been employed with the Alberta Forest Service, Dow Chemical/Dow Elanco, Woods and Forests South Australia, Conservation and Land Management Western Australia, Ace Vegetation Control Service Ltd. For the past 24 years, Milo has worked as a consultant in post-establishment silviculture across Canada and the US Pacific Northwest. He has helped silviculturists develop sustainable, cost effective reforestation processes in the boreal environment while fostering First Nations engagement with forest managers in positive and meaningful ways.

Register now.


March 19th: Strip Cut Understory Protection (SCUP) Trial

Ivan Bjelanovic and Phil Comeau

Presenter Bios

Ivan completed a master’s degree in Forest Biology and Management at the University of Alberta under the supervision of Phil Comeau, and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Forestry from the University of Belgrade in Serbia. Currently, Ivan is working with the Canadian Forest Service on the design and development of the Wildland fire risk web application. Ivan’s involvement the DADE project was in the role of Research Assistant at the University of Alberta. At the UofA he worked on several projects within the Forest Stand Dynamics research group developing tools to predict ecosite-based forest productivity in addition to the evaluation of various silvicultural trials.

Phil is Professor Emeritus at the University of Alberta. He was Professor of Silviculture and Stand Dynamics at the UofA from 2000 to 2017. Phil has conducted research relating to competition dynamics, competition management, mixedwood management, silviculture, silvicultural systems, and Growth and Yield in western Canada. Phil has been the chair of the Western Boreal Growth and Yield (WESBOGY) project team since 2003 and has worked in the continued development of the Mixedwood growth model MGM. He was the recipient of the Canadian Institute of Forestry’s Tree of Life Award for the Rocky Mountain Section in 2014 as well as the CIF Scientific Achievement Award in 2016.

Register now.


March 26th: Linking Silviculture to Growth and Yield in Alberta: A new version of the Foothills Reforestation Interactive Planning System (FRIPSY2021)

Dick Dempster

Abstract

How do we know what combinations of reforestation practices will best meet forest management objectives?  FRIPSY 2021 (a new version of the Foothills Reforestation Interactive Planning System) helps answer this question by quantitatively linking reforestation treatments (site preparation, planting, tending and pre-commercial thinning) in the Foothills natural region of Alberta to regeneration performance and long-term growth and yield. The development, features and rollout of the system will be described, along with a discussion of the potential role and limitations of such tools in forest management.

Presenter Bio

Dick Dempster obtained BSc and PhD degrees in Forestry at the University of Wales, and worked as an assistant conservator of forests in Jamaica, before emigrating to Canada in 1974. In Alberta he was initially a forestry planner for Simpson Timber Company in Whitecourt, and then an associate professor at the UofA Department of Forest Science, before establishing his own consulting business. Over the past 40 years, as a forestry consultant  in Alberta, B.C., and the U.K., he has worked on and lead numerous projects in forest policy, inventory, planning and development. He has worked both domestically (Alberta, B.C., Saskatchewan and other Canadian provinces) and internationally (in China, Indonesia, south America, southern Africa and the Caribbean). In 1999 he became Director of the newly formed Foothills Growth and Yield Association (FGYA), in which capacity he continued until 2007, when he returned to the UK. Since then, his main involvement and interest in Alberta has been researching post-disturbance stand development with the FGrOW foothills pine project team.

Register now.


April 23rd: Regenerated Lodgepole pine project (RLP)

Dick Dempster

Presenter Bio

Dick Dempster obtained BSc and PhD degrees in Forestry at the University of Wales, and worked as an assistant conservator of forests in Jamaica, before emigrating to Canada in 1974. In Alberta he was initially a forestry planner for Simpson Timber Company in Whitecourt, and then an associate professor at the UofA Department of Forest Science, before establishing his own consulting business. Over the past 40 years, as a forestry consultant  in Alberta, B.C., and the U.K., he has worked on and lead numerous projects in forest policy, inventory, planning and development. He has worked both domestically (Alberta, B.C., Saskatchewan and other Canadian provinces) and internationally (in China, Indonesia, south America, southern Africa and the Caribbean). In 1999 he became Director of the newly formed Foothills Growth and Yield Association (FGYA), in which capacity he continued until 2007, when he returned to the UK. Since then, his main involvement and interest in Alberta has been researching post-disturbance stand development with the FGrOW foothills pine project team.

Register now.


 

These technical sessions qualify for the AAFMP Continuing Competence Program (CCP) as Category 1 credits. Attendees wishing to claim credits will be required to upload their hours to an AAFMP hosted reporting system.

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