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Caribou behaviour and calving success in relation to oil and gas development: are all disturbances created equal?

Do caribou avoid well sites? Does activity at well sites affect caribou survival?

This project will study how well site activity and re-vegetation influence caribou behaviour and survival. Understanding caribou response to development and restoration will improve caribou recovery planning.

Related Programs:

  • October 2015

    Project Began

    Progress update: The team coordinates with partners and starts collecting data

  • April 2016

    Year 1 Interim Report Delivered

    Progress update: Preliminary results delivered to partners.

  • October 2016

    Year 1 Report

    Progress update: Data analysed and report written.

  • May 2017

    Year 2 Report

    Progress update: The analysis was updated with year 2 data and written up.

  • May 2017

    Preliminary Results Presented

    Progress update: Presentation for the Canadian Society of Ecology and Evolution in Victoria, BC

  • August 2017

    Data Collection Complete

    Progress update: Field work collected from June through August.

  • September 2017

    Data Analysis Underway

    Progress update: Papers and final report in in production.

  • October 2017

    Project Complete

    Progress update: Final report delivered to partners.

Calves and Calve Nots: Predicting Caribou Reproduction from Movement Rates

In the foothills of west-central Alberta, the last of the snow does not melt until May. It is then that the dwindling herds of caribou begin their spring migration up into the Rocky Mountains. They leave behind a landscape rich in nutritious lichen and other delicacies but also—they hope—their predators. The timing is no accident. After a long, harsh winter in the Canadian boreal forest, the herd embarks on the climb up to their mountain refuge. Safer from wolves and far from human activity, the females give birth.

Laura Finnegan

Program Lead

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