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Response of threatened species to linear features and landscape change in a managed forest ecosystem in West Central Alberta

How are caribou affected by the roads and seismic lines criss-crossing their habitat?

This project helps us understand how human use of caribou habitat affects caribou use and movements across their range.

The results will guide science-based restoration of caribou habitat and determine how caribou annual range shifts in response to a dynamic forest landscape.

  • Will be completed by Jan 2014

    LiDAR based terrain metrics for Redrock Prairie Creek and Narraway Ranges

  • ongoing

    Annual landscape change condition sets to match both grizzly bear and caribou GPS location data

  • Starting January 2014

    Fecal pellet collection

  • Ongoing

    Analysis of animal movement data

  • Starting 2015

    Modelling of animal use and forest harvesting

  • Will be completed by April 2014

    Map of priority areas for habitat restoration

  • March 2014

    Annual landscape change condition maps - Completed

    Progress update: Annual landscape change condition maps - Completed

Calves and Calve Nots: Predicting Caribou Reproduction from Movement Rates

In the foothills of west-central Alberta, the last of the snow does not melt until May. It is then that the dwindling herds of caribou begin their spring migration up into the Rocky Mountains. They leave behind a landscape rich in nutritious lichen and other delicacies but also—they hope—their predators. The timing is no accident. After a long, harsh winter in the Canadian boreal forest, the herd embarks on the climb up to their mountain refuge. Safer from wolves and far from human activity, the females give birth.

Infographic: Movement of Predators Influenced by Seismic Lines

Graphical abstract for the paper, "Natural regeneration on seismic lines influences movement behaviour of wolves and grizzly bears."

Laura Finnegan

Program Lead

Gord Stenhouse

Program Lead

Julie Duval

Program Lead

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